Cryptonite for germ theory

Vitamin K

Cryptonite for germ theory

This is from Humanley on telegram. t.me/humanley馃檹馃徑

We are told that bacteria have basic life cycles, when in fact they have complex life cycles.

We are told that bacteria are monomorphic, when in fact they are pleomorphic (can morph into different kinds of bacteria).

Bacteria arise from base units called somatids or microzyma. The microzyma can develop into any kind of bacteria depending on the environmental conditions they are growing in (ie the terrain).

鈥淎nyone who will patiently study with the microscope his own cultures which he knows to be pure can quickly confirm the general observation that rod forms may appear in cultures of cocci, spherical forms in cultures of bacilli, lateral buds and branches and internal globular bodies” Arthur Henrici, MD – 1895

Countless papers have been published showing that bacteria have complex life cycles and are not monomorphic.

The United States Dept. of Agriculture demonstrated that bacteria could change into other bacteria back in 1916 and 1923, as did the United States Health Dept. in 1932.

1916 – https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/catalog/IND43965684

1923 – https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/catalog/IND43966525

1932 – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1996182

Quote from the US Health Dept (1932) – “They found that one type of bacteria could present itself in over a dozen different forms, so different from each other that they have to be accepted as separate species belonging to half a dozen different genera.”

There are countless papers published in the scientific literature documenting extreme pleomorphism and the complex bacterial life cycle.

Everything we think we know about bacteria is probably wrong.

Germs don’t cause disease.

Disease causes germs.

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1. Enderlein E. Bacteria Cyclogeny. Prescott: Enderlein Enterprises Inc; 1925.

2. https://www.jstor.org/stable/30082257

3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2167589/

4. https://www.jstor.org/stable/3859916

5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC379023/

6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC533658/

7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16560237/

8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC440979/

9. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16560823/

10. https://www.bmj.com/content/1/2940/571

11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC375132/

12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC374850/

13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4130434

14. https://www.nature.com/articles/2221285a0

15. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/5522357

16. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7250327/

17. https://www.nature.com/articles/215936a0

18. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2084495

19. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16559356/

20. https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.75.1935.121